MASH4077TV.com

All About M*A*S*H Since 1999

Good-Bye Radar (Part 2) Voted Favorite Episode from Season 8

Last month visitors to MASH4077TV.com voted “Good-Bye Radar (Part 2)” their favorite episode from Season 8. “April Fools” came in second with “Old Soldiers” a close third.

A total of 159 votes were cast, down from 194 votes for July. Every single episode received at least one vote, with “Lend a Hand” and “Stars and Stripes” each getting just the one. Here are the complete results:

  1. Good-Bye Radar (Part 2) (14%, 22 Votes)
  2. April Fools (11%, 18 Votes)
  3. Old Soldiers (11%, 17 Votes)
  4. Heal Thyself (7%, 11 Votes)
  5. Period of Adjustment (6%, 10 Votes)
  6. Life Time (6%, 10 Votes)
  7. Mr. and Mrs. Who? (6%, 9 Votes)
  8. Dreams (6%, 9 Votes)
  9. Good-Bye Radar (Part 1) (3%, 5 Votes)
  10. Too Many Cooks (3%, 5 Votes)
  11. The Yalu Brick Road (3%, 5 Votes)
  12. Are You Now, Margaret? (3%, 5 Votes)
  13. Dear Uncle Abdul (3%, 4 Votes)
  14. Morale Victory (3%, 4 Votes)
  15. Yessir, That’s Our Baby (3%, 4 Votes)
  16. Captains Outrageous (3%, 4 Votes)
  17. Nurse Doctor (2%, 3 Votes)
  18. Guerrilla My Dreams (1%, 2 Votes)
  19. Private Finance (1%, 2 Votes)
  20. Bottle Fatigue (1%, 2 Votes)
  21. Back Pay (1%, 2 Votes)
  22. War Co-Respondent (1%, 2 Votes)
  23. Goodbye, Cruel World (1%, 2 Votes)
  24. Lend a Hand (1%, 1 Votes)
  25. Stars and Stripes (0%, 1 Votes)

Personally, my vote went to “Old Soldiers” and I am honestly surprised it did not win. I equally surprised that “Good-Bye Radar (Part 2)” topped the poll last month. I didn’t realize it had so many fans.

Hit the comments with your reactions to the results. Which episode did you vote for and why?

And don’t forget to vote in this month’s poll, which asks visitors to chose their favorite episode from Season 9.

Episode Spotlight: Wheelers and Dealers

Every Monday, I spotlight a random episode of M*A*S*H, providing a brief review and asking readers to offer their thoughts.

“Wheelers and Dealers” (#219, 10×05)
Originally Broadcast: Monday, November 23rd, 1981
Written by Thad Mumford & Dan Wilcox
Directed by Charles S. Dubin

Capsule Summary: B.J. obsesses about money after learning that Peg is getting a job; meanwhile, Colonel Potter has to take a driving course.

From what I’ve read over the years, this is an episode that very few M*A*S*H fans enjoy. It’s true that it features yet another chapter in the never-ending saga of B.J. missing his family but for some reason it didn’t bother me that much this time. Maybe that’s because we got to see him get chewed out by Margaret and later show up in the Mess Tent to apologize. He really got put in his place.

B.J.’s initial reaction to Peg’s letter is somewhat understandable. He wasn’t upset that Peg was getting a job because he felt a woman’s place should be in the home. And it wasn’t just that he felt bad he wasn’t able to provide for his family. Peg apparently put him through medical school and their plan was for him to then support her so she could stay home and take care of Erin. Now, thanks to the Army, that plan has been thrown out the window.

If B.J. had seriously, rather than irrationally and bizarrely, tried to earn money to pay off the mortgage, the episode may have worked better. He could have turned to Charles again, who lent him money for a down payment on a piece of land in “The Merchant of Korea” in Season 6. He could have tried to sell everything he owned, for example, and then somehow have to get it all back by the end of the episode to maintain the status quo.

Colonel Potter’s storyline here isn’t terrible even if there is some overacting on the part of Harry Morgan. The best part is Rizzo and his fearful response to having to teach his commanding office along with his continued attempts to let Potter slide through without doing any real work.

“Nobody is stuck here just like me!”

The pinball machine sparking and dying after B.J. smashes it with his hands is a bit much. Is he the reverse Fonzie? And just who at the 4077th is going to be able to fix it? I doubt Igor or Rizzo know how to fix pinball machines.

For some reason the Internet Movie Database entry for this episode lists Eileen Saki as part of the cast, playing Rosie. She’s not included in the ending credits and I don’t remember seeing her in the episode.

Tony Becker, who played the late-for-driving-school Private Brown in this episode, later guest starred in a February 1982 episode of Trapper John, M.D.

Name That Episode III #102

The Name That Episode game is played Tuesdays and Thursdays, with images posted randomly between 12PM and 6PM Eastern. Players can participate as often as they like. An archive of past rounds can be found here. Today’s image can be found below. Can you name the episode it’s from? Feel free to post guesses in the comments section. As always, the winner gets bragging rights.

And the Winner Is: converse_craig, who correctly identified “Heroes” from Season 10.

Name That Episode

Name That Episode III #101

The Name That Episode game is played Tuesdays and Thursdays, with images posted randomly between 12PM and 6PM Eastern. Players can participate as often as they like. An archive of past rounds can be found here. Today’s image can be found below. Can you name the episode it’s from? Feel free to post guesses in the comments section. As always, the winner gets bragging rights.

And the Winner Is: Big Daddy O’Reilly, who correctly identified “Post Op” from Season 5.

Name That Episode

Episode Spotlight: The Moose

Every Monday, I spotlight a random episode of M*A*S*H, providing a brief review and asking readers to offer their thoughts.

“The Moose” (#5, 1×05)
Originally Broadcast: Sunday, October 15th, 1972
Written by Laurence Marks
Directed by Hy Averback

Capsule Summary: Hawkeye and Trapper are shocked and disgusted to learn that a soldier has purchased a South Korean woman as his personal servant.

I think this was one of the first episodes of M*A*S*H I ever saw when I started watching the series on FX back in the late 1990s. It’s not that I have a particularly vivid memory of watching it. The term “moose” stuck with me. That’s what I remember.

Although they are without a doubt the good guys here, Hawkeye and Trapper are nevertheless pretty patronizing when they talk about Young Hi not understanding what they’re saying while she’s standing between them. And what should we make of the fact that Hawkeye enjoyed some of benefits of having Young Hi around? He may not have been a fan of her cleaning but he allowed her to shave him and the tag suggests she also shined his boots.

Radar mentions that the Army will deal with soldiers that have a moose if they find out about it. But Colonel Blake makes it pretty clear that there’s nothing he or anyone can do because Sergeant Baker’s commanding officer also has a moose. Why couldn’t Hawkeye complain to someone outside Baker’s chain of command, someone in the JAG corps, for example? Or ask Radar to make some inquiries.

The poker game was a good solution, I suppose. I’m not sure why Baker agreed to participate considering he didn’t really like Hawkeye. More importantly, how could Baker not realize that Hawkeye had an earpiece? It’s a good thing Baker always held his cards in such away that Radar, using a telescope never seen again, could see them.

“The Moose” is notable for having very few regular cast members. Hawkeye, Trapper, and Radar are in it. Colonel Blake is in it as well but has just a few lines. Frank and Margaret are not in it. Neither are Father Mulcahy or Klinger, for that matter, although at this early point in the series that wasn’t unusual. And yet, despite involving only a handful of regular cast members, because Season 1 featured so many recurring characters, you don’t miss the characters that aren’t in it.

That’s something I’ve always liked about very early episodes. Spearchucker and Ho-Jon, limited as their roles are, help flesh out this episode and make the 4077th feel like a pretty big place. Seeing Ugly John and Leslie Scorch, who are little more than extras here, only adds to the impression that there are countless stories to be told at the 4077th and not all of them have to involve every character. Sadly, by the last few seasons, the pendulum had swung too far in the other direction and every episode had to involve every main character no matter what.

Spearchucker chats with Young Hi

According to the captions, Leslie’s little noise as she ducks under the clothesline to give Henry a kiss is a “chirp.” I wonder if that was included in the script or of Linda Meiklejohn made it up on the spot.

This was the first of two appearances by Barbara Brownell as Lt. Jones. The other was in “Love Story.” I wonder if she would have been in more episodes if the decision hadn’t been made to cut back on the number of recurring characters about halfway through Season 1.

Virginia Ann Lee (credited in this episode as Virginia Lee) later played Kyong Ja in “Exorcism” during Season 5. Her Internet Movie Database profile states she also appeared uncredited in “Welcome to Korea” (Season 4) and some sources indicate she made an uncredited appearance in “Abyssinia, Henry” (Season 3) as well.

We never learn why Sergeant Baker was at the 4077th. All we know is he was looking for Colonel Blake. When Hawkeye tries to pull rank on him, Baker refers to himself as a transient, which I believe means he was only temporarily staying there and did not technically fall under the chain of command.

Name That Episode III #100

The Name That Episode game is played Tuesdays and Thursdays, with images posted randomly between 12PM and 6PM Eastern. Players can participate as often as they like. An archive of past rounds can be found here. Today’s image can be found below. Can you name the episode it’s from? Feel free to post guesses in the comments section. As always, the winner gets bragging rights.

And the Winner Is: Seoul City Sue, who correctly identified “Der Tag” from Season 4.

Name That Episode

Name That Episode III #99

The Name That Episode game is played Tuesdays and Thursdays, with images posted randomly between 12PM and 6PM Eastern. Players can participate as often as they like. An archive of past rounds can be found here. Today’s image can be found below. Can you name the episode it’s from? Feel free to post guesses in the comments section. As always, the winner gets bragging rights.

And the Winner Is: Seoul City Sue, who correctly identified “Showtime” from Season 1.

Name That Episode

Episode Spotlight: Bananas, Crackers and Nuts

Every Monday, I spotlight a random episode of M*A*S*H, providing a brief review and asking readers to offer their thoughts.

“Bananas, Crackers and Nuts” (#7, 1×07)
Originally Broadcast: Sunday, November 5th, 1972
Written by Burt Styler
Directed by Bruce Bilson

Capsule Summary: Hawkeye pretends he’s lost touch with reality in order to get some R&R.

This is a really good episode even if the plot is implausible and the ending contrived. It helps that it features Marcia Strassman’s third appearance as the lovely Nurse Margie Cutler. I can’t believe Frank fell for Hawkeye’s wacky shenanigans even if Trapper was working hard to sell Hawkeye’s insanity. Maybe Frank didn’t believe him. Maybe he was just in enough shock to initially agree before coming to his senses. Margaret doesn’t appear to have believed Hawkeye was actually nuts.

That said, if any of us were in Frank’s shoes hearing Hawkeye talk about eating a North Korean’s liver, maybe we’d be a little shocked, too. Larry Linville did a wonderful job with his reactions in this scene. Trapper and Radar didn’t seem very surprised or disgusted, which should have raised some flags with Frank.

I’m also not sure any man in 1950, even Hawkeye, would have so openly joked about being in love with another man to a psychiatrist. Hawkeye was sure Captain Sherman would realize he wasn’t serious but it seems like a dangerous road to go down.

As for the ending, it’s easy to overlook how far-fetched Hawkeye and Trapper’s plan to get rid of Captain Sherman was because it was such a hilarious plot. What are the odds he wouldn’t realize he was in the wrong tent? It wasn’t that dark and Margaret’s tent looks nothing like the VIP tent.

The best part of the episode for me is the very real argument between best friends Hawkeye and Trapper after they return to the Swamp and discover the Still empty. Trapper’s “And don’t call me knucklehead!” is perhaps my favorite line, followed closely by Hawkeye’s “Whoever the them, we were always us.”

“I don’t think I needed that.”

Father Mulchay and Klinger are not in this episode.

Why was Margaret wearing her dress uniform (without the shirt, tie, or hat) in the Mess Tent?

It was real regular army of Colonel Blake to so smugly ignore Hawkeye and Trapper as he left for his own vacation.

I wonder how long it took to get the shadow on the wall in Margaret’s tent just right. And was it really Loretta Swit providing the shadow?

Name That Episode III #98

The Name That Episode game is played Tuesdays and Thursdays, with images posted randomly between 12PM and 6PM Eastern. Players can participate as often as they like. An archive of past rounds can be found here. Today’s image can be found below. Can you name the episode it’s from? Feel free to post guesses in the comments section. As always, the winner gets bragging rights.

And the Winner Is: converse_craig, who correctly identified “Rally Round the Flagg Boys” from Season 7.

Name That Episode

Gerald S. O’Loughlin (1921-2015)

Actor Gerald S. O’Loughlin, who played General Schwerin in Season 11’s “Bombshells,” passed away on July 31st at the age of 93. He was credited as Gerald O’Loughlin in that episode.

Gerald S. O’Loughlin as General Schwerin

His acting career dates back to the early 1950s and included guest appearances on shows like Mister Peepers, Ben Casey, The Defenders, and Mannix. He is best known for playing Lt. Ryker on ABC’s The Rookies from 1972 to 1976. Other regular TV roles included Automan (1983-1984) and Our House (1986-1988). According to O’Loughlin’s Internet Movie Database profile, his last TV role was a 2001 episode of Judging Amy; his last acting role of any kind was a short film in 2008.

An obituary can be found at The Hollywood Reporter.

(Thanks to Dan for passing this along.)