Where Are They Now?


Below you’ll find brief summaries of what the cast (and producers) of M*A*S*H have been up to since they either left the series or it came to an end in 1983. Although M*A*S*H may be their main claim to fame, most of the cast continued acting after the series ended. Sadly, several members of the M*A*S*H family have passed away in the decades since the show went off the air.

There have been two televised M*A*S*H retrospectives. The entire cast reunited in 1991 for “Memories of M*A*S*H” on CBS. In 2002, the surviving cast members came together for the “M*A*S*H 30th Anniversary Reunion Special” on FOX.

In May 2015, interviews with most of the surviving cast as well as producers and writers were featured in “MeTV Remembers the M*A*S*H Finale,” a special presentation of “Goodbye, Farewell and Amen” that has since been repeated several times. Also, Loretta Swit, Gary Burghoff, Jamie Farr, Mike Farrell, and William Christopher were interviewed by Toledo TV station WTVG/13aba in January 2016 for a half-hour special titled “M*A*S*H Memories & Magic.”

Note: Most of the images on this page are from the “30th Anniversary Reunion Special” broadcast in 2002. The images for Larry Linville and McLean Stevenson are from “Memories of M*A*S*H,” which aired in 1991.

Alan Alda (Hawkeye)

Alan Alda has remained very active in the three decades since M*A*S*H went off the air. In 1983, shortly after the series wrapped, he produced The Four Seasons for CBS. The short-lived sitcom continued the story of his 1981 feature film. He appeared in a handful of movies during the late 1980s and the 1990s. Alda made his return to TV in 1999 with a six-episode stint on NBC’s popular medical drama ER, which earned him an Emmy Award nomination in 2000.

Image of Alan Alda from 2002
Alan Alda in 2002

From 2004 to 2006, Alda had a recurring role on The West Wing as presidential hopeful Senator Arnold Vinick. He was twice nominated for Emmy Awards for the role, winning in 2006. Other recent TV appearances include recurring roles on 30 Rock (NBC, 2009-2010), The Big C (Showtime, 2011-2013), and The Blacklist (NBC, 2013-2014).

On the big screen, Alda earned an Academy Award nomination for his role in The Aviator (2004). Other recent films include Nothing But the Truth (2008), Flash of Genius (2008), Tower Heist (2011), The Longest Ride (2015), and Bridge of Spies (2015). Some of Alda’s work on the stage include QED (2001-2002), Glengarry Glen Ross (2005), and Love Letters (2014).

Alda has released two memoirs: Never Have Your Dog Stuffed: And Other Things I’ve Learned (September 2005) and Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself (October 2007).

Alda was interviewed for the Archive of American Television in November 2000. His interview can be found here.

Gary Burghoff (Radar)

After leaving M*A*S*H in 1979, Gary Burghoff made a handful of guest roles on TV shows like Fantasy Island and The Love Boat. He made a cameo appearance in the January 16th, 1984 episode of AfterMASH on CBS followed by a full-blown guest appearance the following week. Later that year, he starred in an unsold sitcom pilot for CBS called “W*A*L*T*E*R” in which Walter O’Reilly became a cop in St. Louis.

Image of Gary Burghoff from 2002
Gary Burghoff in 2002

He appeared in a few films in the early 1990s. A 1995 guest appearance on Burke’s Law was his last acting role until 2010 when he co-starred in the film Daniel’s Lot. He hosted Pets: Part of the Family, a how-to series about pets that aired on public TV from 1999 to 2000. Burghoff toured more than 100 cities in 1999 and 2000 starring in Neil Simon’s play Last of the Red Hot Lovers.

Burghoff released an autobiography, Gary Burghoff: To M*A*S*H and Back: My Life in Poems and Songs (That Nobody Ever Wanted to Publish!), in June 2009.

William Christopher (Father Mulcahy)

William Christopher co-starred in AfterMASH on CBS from 1983 to 1984 alongside Harry Morgan and Jamie Farr. Since then, he’s acted sporadically. In 1997, Christopher co-starred with Jamie Farr in a touring production of The Odd Couple. He made a handful of TV guest appearances in the 1990s, including Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (1997) and Mad About You (1998). He came out of retirement in 2012 to play Father Tobias on the NBC soap opera Days of Our Lives, appearing in more than 10 episodes.

Image of William Christopher from 2002
William Christopher in 2002

Along with his his wife Barbara, Christopher wrote Mixed Blessings, a non-fiction book about raising a son with autism. It was published in 1989. The two continue to work promoting autism awareness through the National Autistic Society.

William Christopher passed away in December 2016 at the age of 84.

William Christopher: October 20th, 1932 – December 31st, 2016

Jamie Farr (Klinger)

Jamie Farr continued playing Maxwell Q. Klinger on AfterMASH from 1983 to 1985 on CBS alongside Harry Morgan and William Christopher. He’s acted sporadically since then, appearing in a handful of movies and TV shows in the 1980s and 1990s. His most recent TV appearances were a February 2007 episode of The War at Home in February 2007 and an episode of Bella and the Bulldogs in April 2016.

Image of Jamie Farr from 2002
Jamie Farr in 2002

Recent film roles include A Path of Sundays (2001) and This World (2013). On the stage, he co-starred with William Christopher in a production of The Odd Couple in 1997; temporarily replaced Frank Gorshin as George Burns in Say Goodnight, Gracie in 2004; starred in a production of Tuesdays with Morrie in 2011; and starred in a productions of The Last Romance in 2013 and 2014.

From 1984 to 2012, Farr lent his name to a women’s professional golf tournament played in Sylvania, Ohio every year (except for 1986 and 2011). He released an autobiography, Just Farr Fun, in 1994. In May 2007, Farr hosted the Hallmark Channel’s “M*A*S*H Bash 07: Klinger Edition” marathon. He later hosted a marathon called “The Best by Farr” for MeTV in 2016.

Farr was interviewed for the Archive of American Television in December 2011. His interview can be viewed here.

Mike Farrell (B.J.)

Since the end of M*A*S*H, Mike Farrell has remained busy as an actor and an activist. He appeared in a number of made-for-TV movies in the 1980s and 1990s. From 1996 to 1999, he voiced Jonathan Kent on the animated FOX TV series Superman: The Animated Series (his wife, Shelley Fabares, voiced Martha Kent). From 1999 to 2002, Farrell co-starred on the NBC drama Providence.

Image of Mike Farrell from 2002
Mike Farrell in 2002

Some of Farrell’s recent TV roles include guest appearances on Smith (CBS, 2007), Desperate Housewives (ABC, 2007-2008), Ghost Whisperer (CBS, 2009), and Supernatural (The CW, 2012). He had a recurring role on SundanceTV’s The Red Road from 2014 to 2015.

Over the years, Farrell has lent his name and support to a number of social and political causes. He also served three terms as First Vice President of the Screen Actors Guild, beginning in 2002.

Farrell released his autobiography, Just Call Me Mike: A Journey from Actor to Activist, in March 2007. His second book, Of Mule and Man, was published in May 2009.

Larry Linville (Frank)

Larry Linville left M*A*S*H in 1977 after five seasons spent playing Frank Burns. He felt he had taken the character as far as he could. Over the next three decades, he worked regularly on television. From 1978 to 1979 he played Major General Kevin Kelley on NBC’s Grandpa Goes to Washington. In 1981, he played Lyle Block on Checking In, a short-lived CBS sitcom spun-off from The Jeffersons. He followed that with a regular role on another short-lived CBS sitcom, Herbie the Love Bug, in 1982. He also had a supporting role on Paper Dolls, a 1984 ABC prime time soap opera.

Image of Larry Linville from 1991
Larry Linville in 1991

Linville made guest appearances on shows like CHiPsThe Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Airwolf, Night Court, Nurses, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, and Murder, She Wrote. He made his final TV appearance in an October 1999 episode of Great Performances on PBS.

Some of Linville’s films after leaving M*A*S*H include Earth Girls Are Easy (1988), Rock ‘n’ Roll High School Forever (1991), A Million to Juan (1994), Fatal Pursuit (1995), and Pressure Point (1997).

After battling cancer for several years, Linville passed away due to complications of pneumonia in April 2000.

Larry Linville: September 29th, 1939 – April 10th, 2000

Harry Morgan (Colonel Potter)

After M*A*S*H ended, Harry Morgan starred in AfterMASH alongside Jamie Farr and William Christopher. The sitcom ran on CBS from 1983 to 1984. He continued acting, primarily on television, until the late 1990s. In 1986, he co-starred in Blacke’s Magic, an NBC crime drama. He then starred in a syndicated sitcom called You Can’t Take It With You from 1987 to 1988.

Image of Harry Morgan from 2002
Harry Morgan in 2002

Morgan also made guest appearances on TV shows like The Love Boat, Murder She Wrote, The Twilight Zone, Grace Under Fire, and 3rd Rock from the Sun. His final acting role was a guest appearance in an episode of a CBS sitcom called Love & Money that aired during the 1999-2000 season. David Ogden Stiers had a regular role in the sitcom. According to the Internet Movie Database, Morgan’s episode never aired.

In the early 1990s, Morgan teamed up with Walter Matthau for three made-for-TV movies about a lawyer (Matthau) and a judge (Morgan). On the big screen, Morgan had a small role in the 1987 feature film Dragnet starring Dan Aykroyd and Tom Hanks.

Morgan was interviewed for the Archive of American Television in April 2004. His interview can be found here.

Harry Morgan passed away in December 2011 at the age of 96.

Harry Morgan: April 10th, 1915 – December 7th, 2011

Wayne Rogers (Trapper)

Only a year after leaving M*A*S*H, Wayne Rogers was starring in his own TV series called City of Angels about a detective in the 1930s. It ran for 13 episodes on NBC from February to May 1976. He starred in House Calls, a CBS sitcom in which he played a doctor, from 1979 to 1982. A total of 57 episodes were produced.

Image of Wayne Rogers from 2002
Wayne Rogers in 2002

Rogers appeared in numerous made-for-TV movies during the 1980s, including I Dream of Jeannie: 15 Years Later in 1985. He took over the role of Tony Nelson from Larry Hagman. He had a recurring role in Murder, She Wrote from 1993 to 1995. In the early 2000s, he appeared in a handful of feature films like Frozen with Fear (2001), Three Days of Rain (2002), and Nobody Knows Anything! (2003). The latter was his final acting role. In January 2007, Rogers hosted the Hallmark Channel’s “M*A*S*H Bash 07” marathon.

Outside of acting, Rogers was a successful businessman and investor. From 2012 to 2015 he served as a panelist on Cashin’ In, an investment program on the Fox News Channel. In January 2016, host Eric Bolling paid tribute to Rogers.

Rogers passed away in December 2015 at the age of 82.

Wayne Rogers: April 7th, 1933 – December 31st, 2015

McLean Stevenson (Colonel Blake)

After leaving M*A*S*H in 1975 at the end of its third season, McLean Stevenson starred in four different sitcoms, all of which were unsuccessful. The first was called The McLean Stevenson Show. He played the owner of a hardware store trying to juggle his business with his family. It ran for 10 episodes on NBC from 1976 to 1977. Next came In the Beginning, a CBS sitcom that ran for just five episodes from September to October 1978.

Image of McLean Stevenson from 1991
McLean Stevenson in 1991

Hello, Larry was his most successful post-M*A*S*H TV series. A spin-off of Diff’rent Strokes, it ran for two seasons and 38 episodes on NBC from January 1979 to April 1980. He played a divorced radio talk show host who moves to Portland with his teenage daughters. From February to June 1983, Stevenson starred in Condo on ABC, a sitcom about two families living in the same condominium complex. His final regular TV role was Dirty Dancing on CBS from 1988 to 1989.

Stevenson also made guest appearances on TV shows like Hotel, The Love Boat, and The Golden Girls. His last credited acting role was the miniseries Tales of the City in 1993.

McLean Stevenson passed away of a heart attack in February 1996.

McLean Stevenson: November 14th, 1929 – February 15th, 1996

David Ogden Stiers (Charles Emerson Winchester, III)

David Ogden Stiers has remained very active since the end of M*A*S*H, with acting roles on TV and the big screen. In 1985, he played Congressman Sam Greene on the blockbuster CBS miniseries North & South. He was also in the sequel, North & South, Book II, the following year. From 1986 to 1988, he appeared in a string of made-for-TV movies based on Perry Mason.

Image of David Ogden Stiers from 2002
David Ogden Stiers in 2002

In 1998, he had a regular role on the ABC sitcom Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place, although his character was soon phased out. His next regular TV role was Love & Money, a short-lived CBS sitcom that aired briefly during the 1999-2000 season. From 2002 to 2007, Stiers had a recurring role on The Dead Zone as well as a recurring role on Stargate: Atlantis from 2006 to 2007.

Stiers has made numerous guest appearances over the last several decades, including Alf, Murder, She Wrote , Matlock, Wings, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Cybill, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, The Trouble with Normal, Touched by An Angel, Frasier, Worst Week of My Life, and Rizzoli & Isles.

In 1991, Stiers voiced Cogsworth in the animated movie >Beauty and the Beast. Since then, he’s worked regularly as a voiceover artist, i with roles in movies like Pocahontas, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Lilo & Stich plus TV shows like Justice League, Lilo & Sticth: The Series, American Experience, and Regular Show in Space. Stiers has also lent his voice to a number of video games.

Outside of acting, Stiers is an associate conductor for the Newport Symphany Orchestra.

Loretta Swit (Major Margaret Houlihan)

Loretta Swit appeared in a number of TV shows, made-for-TV movies, and feature films following the end M*A*S*H, but has not had a credited acting role since 1998. She remains active on stage, however. From 1985 to 1987 she appeared on Broadway in The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Other stage credits include Shirley Valentine, The Vagina Monologues, Forty-Second Street, Cactus Flower, and Love, Loss and What I Wore.

Image of Loretta Swit from 2002
Loretta Swit in 2002

A vocal supporter of animal rights, Swit is a member of Actors and Others for Animals and supports numeroous animal rights organizations. She is also an artist and proceeds from sales of her artwork benefit various animal-related groups and causes. In 1986, she published A Needlepoint Scrapbook.

Swit was interviewed for the Archive of American Television in August 2004. Her interview can be found here.

Larry Gelbart

The man responsible for developing M*A*S*H for television left the series in 1976 after four seasons. Larry Gelbart felt he had contributed all he could to the show. In 1980, he served as executive producer and writer for a short-lived NBC comedy-drama called United States, starring Beau Bridges and Helen Shaver.

Image of Larry Gelbart from 2002
Larry Gelbart in 2002

When M*A*S*H ended, Gelbart was brought in to create AfterMASH for CBS. He wrote three episodes during the spin-off’s first season and directed two. From 1997 to 1998, he executive produced Fast Track, a Showtime drama starring Keith Carradine. In 2003, he wrote and co-produced a made-for-TV movie called And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself for HBO. It was his final TV or film project.

Gelbart also wrote the screenplays for the feature films Oh, God! (1977), Tootsie (1982); Blame It on Rio (1984), and Bedazzled (2000).

A memoir was published in 1997: Laughing Matters: On Writing M*A*S*H, Tootsie, Oh, God! and a Few Other Funny Things.Gelbart was interviewed for the Archive of American Television in May 1998. His interview can be found here.

Larry Gelbart passed away in September 2009 at the age of 81.

Larry Gelbart: February 25th, 1928 – September 11th, 2009

Gene Reynolds

Gene Reynolds left M*A*S*H in 1977 after Season 5 but remained a creative consult until the series ended. He went on to help create and produce Lou Grant for CBS. The series was a spin-off of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. It ran for five seasons, ending in 1983. Reynolds wrote and directed a number of episodes.

Image of Gene Reynolds from 2002
Gene Reynolds in 2002

After Lou Grant, Reynolds executive produced several TV shows, including Hometown (1985), Mr. President (1987), and Blossom (1991). Also in 1991, he helped executive producer “Memories of M*A*S*H” for CBS. Reynolds directed episodes of numerous TV shows, including Heartbeat (1988), Life Goes On (1989-1990), Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (1993), and Touched by an Angel (1995-1998).

More recently, he came out of retirement to serve as a executive producer for the “M*A*S*H 30th Anniversary Reunion Special” in 2002.

Reynolds was interviewed for the Archive of American Television in August 2000. His interview can be found here.

Burt Metcalfe

Burt Metcalfe stayed with M*A*S*H for its entire run, moving from associate producer to producer to executive producer. He then went on to serve as executive producer for AfterMASH from 1983 to 1984. He also directed more than a dozen episodes.

Image of Burt Metcalfe from 2002
Burt Metcalfe in 2002

From 1989 to 1990, Metcalfe helped produce FM, a sitcom that aired on NBC. He was an executive producer for “Memories of M*A*S*H” in 1991. In 1993, he created the CBS sitcom Cutters, which ran for five episodes. After that, he retired.

In 2002, Metcalfe came out of retirement to serve as an executive producer for “M*A*S*H 30th Anniversary Reunion Special.”


Published April 14th, 2002
Last updated August 27th, 2017

540 Comments

  • Susan Shaw says:

    For those in the UK Mash is on the quest channel and quest +1hour also on true movies and last but by no means least it is on the forces channel which is also on freeware the forces channel has it on for 2 hours on a Saturday and Sunday

    • Juliet says:

      I’m watching every one again and it still has the ability to make me laugh but also to move me to tears. They all feel like old friends.

  • Vilma says:

    Love them all

  • Dale Allen says:

    Love it….I’m glad it’s on t.v. every night.

  • Renee says:

    I loved MASH when it originally aired and had a , “Farewell to MASH” party during the 2 hour finale. Everyone came as their favorite MASH character. I got mess trays to serve the snacks and died a table cloth kaki with 4077 M*A*S*H, stenciled on the, in black. It was bitter-sweet, but we had a ball!
    Still watch it on, ME TV, and NETFLIX. There’s a quiz on the show, on the internet, I got 100%, guess I’ve seen the reruns enough to have them memorized. Stoll don’t tire of watching it, though!

  • Steve Tosh says:

    The show was so much better after Stevenson and Linville

    • Kim says:

      Yes agree , although they had there own style of humor which was good up to them being replaced with Steirs and Morgan . The one we all missed was when Radar left the show . Watch the shows every night , still one of the best series made , thanks for all the great entertainment I still get from the show guys and gals.

    • felicia of york,pa says:

      I first saw mash on tv was in Jersery,City N,j. In 1975 I was at my great aunts apartment and i remember like it was just yesterday i was 7 yrs old and Mike Ferrall who played BJ. I met in Baltimore ,Md a few yrs back i have his book.

    • Ivy says:

      No no no no no no no. Nothing compared to the first three glorious years.

  • Michael Neilson says:

    The smartest written tv series on tv
    black comody at its best
    verbel master piece
    spot on timming actors

  • john mullan ireland says:

    loved the series.thought provoking and moving episodes.extremely clever dialogue and wonderfully crafted characters. will never be equalled.

  • Doug Bright says:

    Best show ever. Never tire of the repeats. Humourous, happy-sad & every emotion beyond. Covers a panoply of sentiments.
    Magic show that grows on one so profoundly. .
    Sad to read of those who have passed.
    RIP those who have & Good Job to those still with us. You are all great friends.
    D 🙂

  • gregg brentlinger says:

    I enjoyed the comedy of MASH, but not the political accusations of the show. Wars are not pleasant, but they are a part of history, and should be recognized for the lessons that these armed conflicts bring to us. People should realize that wars will always happen, no matter how hard we try to prevent them, and no amount of comedy and humor will make them disappear.

    • Ivy says:

      Vietnam was still going on at the time and the accusations were aimed at that unpopular, destructive, expensive conflict that never should have happened.

  • Lynn Walmsley says:

    There will never be another program like MASH it’s humour is timeless. Treated myself last Christmas to the complete box set and enjoying watching time and again. The cast gel so well, can laugh and cry at the same time. Brilliant.

  • Peter Carrington says:

    I watched every episode of MASH and as a american comedy/drama it was the best tv series ever produced not like the rubbish that they make today(i am a kiwi by the way).The cast were outstanding as were the writers and they blended the stupidity of war and black humor perfectly.I doubt that another series will ever equal it.

  • Bernice Taylor-Brown says:

    Just this week I have been through so many emotions watching MASH- Colonal Potter giving his horse away- Father Mulcahy doubting his usefulness- brilliant script and brilliant acting- a classic series- I will never tire of watching it.

  • Bernice Taylor-Brown says:

    Just this week I have been through so many emotions watching MASH- Colonel Potter giving his horse away- Father Mulcahy doubting his usefulness- brilliant script and brilliant acting- a classic series- I will never tire of watching it.

  • Val. Luscott. says:

    I loved it then .I love it now

  • ken says:

    one of the best series ever

  • Jo Donovan says:

    I’ve watched Mash over and over again. Only this past weekend, we had the final episode on TV and both my husband and myself found ourselves crying. Yet here i am as i wrote this watching it all again.
    Fabulous actors and such though provoking acting. Many a conversation about surgery or something we have seen on an episode, can go late into the evening.

  • Adam Davis says:

    I’m 34, and know for certain that this is the best show ever. I’m addicted to watching it over and over. Bless them all!

  • Mary Pegden says:

    I watched the original series loved them now watching all the repeats and loving them even more. Such great writing and wonderful acting.

  • Mike Jones says:

    Hi I am now 72 and watched every episode of MASH right from the first one. I also have the entire box set, yet every time it comes on TV I watch it again. There has never been and never will be a greater series’s on TV as MASH. A big thank you to all who acted in it and wrote it. They have my utmost gratitude. God Bless. Regards Mike.

  • John Taylor (UK) says:

    Love it. Watch it every night on true entertainment
    It’s still one of The best and it still makes me laugh.
    Reminds me of my posting to Thailand (Ubon) in the mid 60s.wife loves Jamie Farr Klinger
    God bless you all.

  • Richard says:

    Look foreword to watching each night during the week. Have box set but will watch any time.
    If you listen intently you seem to pick up some new one liners that lead into something else.
    Should never be taken off air”……..an absolute classic.

  • vera tausk says:

    Thank God for reruns!
    Those who did not watch the original are now blessed!
    It was a fantastic show – between laughing and crying,
    and every emotion between, I loved every minute, and am
    just as if it were new, enjoying it again.
    Praise and applause to the writers, producers, and mostly
    the ENTIRE CAST. You’ve given me, as well as the rest
    of the world, many tears, laughs, and fantastic hours of
    pleasure, [email protected]
    vera

  • Barbara Eylers says:

    I have seen Mash ever since it has been on Me TV. I have always said Radar was the star. He was a wonderful actor, his facial expressions said it all. The cast was top notch. I still watch and will watch as long as it is on. I saw Mash when it first came on TV and will watch as long as ME TV carries it.

    • Crabapple Cove says:

      ME TV is a great channel! Most of our “TV” these days is streaming via Amazon Prime. When we do watch broadcast TV 90% of the time we have it on ME TV with the other 10% going to Masterpiece & other PBS shows.

      I have been a M*A*S*H fan since the mid-70’s and still watch it almost daily. I agree with you that Radar is the heart and soul of the show. I like all of the characters but the show was never quite the same without Radar.

    • Adam Davis says:

      I agree! It never gets old. I love it!

  • Holly says:

    I have watched this show so many times that it is apart of me. I own the whole series. To make it funny I have two copies of this show. I really love watching the show when I get very depressed. It helps cheers you up. I also love watching it anytime. It is just a great show with great actors. Very great memories go a long with the show. Just great all around.

  • Steve says:

    There are very few things in life that choke me up, but just the thought of watching the last episode does it. I grew up watching this show through a rough childhood and it’s funny how these characters became like close friends to me. My wife pokes fun at me but I’ve watched the series a dozen times or more and have never been able to watch the last one. Guess it’s too much like saying goodbye. Thank you for a wonderful show.

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